ALESSANDRA RIZZOTTI

ABOUT   WRITING   VOICEOVER   PRODUCING   RESUME   

Writer, Editor. Has written for @hellogiggles "Women Working To Do Good", a series that was a partnership with The White House. @sixwordmemoirs have been published in three Harper Perennial books and articles have been published on @TakePart, Smith, Heeb, and Neave's online magazines. Video art has been featured at The Baltic Contemporary Art Museum and Miranda July and Harrell Fletcher's "Learning To Love You More" gallery. Researcher. Thinker. Idea Maker. Connector. Former child model and @FamilyGuyonFOX post girl and Community Manager @GOOD. Follow me @hellorizzotti.

twitter.com/hellorizzotti:

    I wanted so badly to know why

    I had trouble deciding

    I just couldn’t love myself

    Enough to just be

    — 16 hours ago
    What’s Artificial Will Die

    Don’t think of the danger
    Make one dream come true
    Let me hold you like you hold me
    Let me taste you fully
    When you’re down, I’ll be there to get you
    I know where the mirrors itch, it’s inside of your heart
    If you’re gonna make it right, you’re surely going to make it wrong
    Hallelujah, oompahpah
    I wrote you a scribbled note
    If I love you, I’m showing it now
    They laughed at me wanting you
    Said I was reaching for the moon
    I say we have a real cool time tonight
    Raise your legs and squeeze me tight
    Tell your desires of me and tell the reasons why
    Show your feelings of me
    Give me your heart only
    It becomes clear we are to be killed now.
    But I am confident
    An atomic bomb goes off to wipe this earth clean of all life, artificial especially

    — 1 week ago
    Mt. Wilson Observatory

    The first accurate measurement of the speed of light

    The moon hitting the clouds, creating shadows, lined edges, making the sky look bluer, darker, more ominous

    The universe expanded right there

    We saw it through a 60 inch mirror, now metal

    An 11 year solar cycle being understood 

    In reflections

    You took my hand in the darkness

    Becoming my telescope

    I saw Saturn’s rings squeeze me tight

    A direct current powered by the energy of our intertwined fingers

    We saw the heavens

    Light from the surface of Sun to Moon = 8:20 seconds

    Light from the Moon to our faces = 1 second

    2 hours, 43 minutes, 51 seconds 

    For Saturn to reflect back to Earth

    No one else could see our photons

    But us

    image

    Co-written with Scott Lewis. Calculations and facts from Scott Lewis, knowthecosmos.com

    — 1 month ago
    #space  #mt wilson observatory  #telescope 
    Guarded

    When so many people said no to me

    All at once

    I had to figure out why

    Not for their sake

    But for my own

    And when they weren’t willing to share

    I realized I was guarded 

    That I could not open up to myself

    And that being alone

    Would be more probable

    If I didn’t let my demons come over

    Head on, fast

    — 2 months ago

    I had this natural instinct

    to leave the door open.

    It felt inviting. 

    But often,

    a bird would

    fly in, disrupting serenity.

    A worm once gave birth

    in a sparrow’s mouth.

    That was when 

    I made myself

    less available.

    — 2 months ago
    What’s in the box?

    My father has 150 boxes lining his hallways

    In subsidized housing

    Thrown out of his storage unit,

    The boxes stay moldy, full of history

    But I’m not aware of what stories they tell,

    Except the one about the hospital gown he wore during my birth 

    "These boxes are fire hazards," I say.

    They block passages we should be able to walk through

    But he can’t get rid of them because each one 

    Hoards memories,

    Giving him meaning

    Giving me opportunities to learn more

    — 5 months ago
    #30for30BNV 
    How Parenting My Father is One Step Towards Changemaking

    “Start by doing what’s necessary, then do what’s possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” - Francis of Assisi

    My father really wants to go to the desert. After years of living in the snow of Massachusetts, he just wants to die in the sun. We’re exploring more natural options than cremation like freeze drying his body and letting him shatter into dust. Or, just putting him in the ground wrapped in leaves. He’s ok with that. He likes knowing that he will become a part of the earth again in the afterlife. But he really wants to disappear into heat.

    There’s one piece of land in Arizona that he’s eyeing, specifically for his last years. He bought it in the nineties to be a hermit, but he never paid taxes on it, and now, it’s sitting there, waiting for someone else to pick it up. My father has never been responsible. He never paid child support. He always lived off the grid, working under the table, and for 19 years, I never got to know him. He represents the infamous “47 percent" of Americans, who, according to Mitt Romney, never paid federal income taxes even though they were most likely capable. He’s dependent on the government, 100 percent, and I’ve only gotten to know why that’s ok just recently. 

    When I found my father in 2011, 68 years old, hands shaking from Parkinson’s, back hunched over, he was working in a storage unit in Massachusetts, behind a computer, checking one or two people in and out each day, like a gatekeeper. I had traveled to the town he had grown up in because I heard from his estranged sisters that they had seen him from time to time, wandering around the neighborhood on afternoon walks. No one wanted anything to do with him because he was known to take advantage of people, and this is why for so many years, I never bothered to try to find him, even out of curiosity.

    I had called the police station to see if they knew of his whereabouts, and they said they had only one record of a person with his name. Apparently he had reported a “dispute with a customer,” but they couldn’t give me more details unless I came in and proved my identity. Two years prior to that, I had tried finding him, but because there wasn’t a police record at the time, he was still off the grid. When I walked into the station, the police didn’t ask me for my ID, though. They just knew that I was my father’s daughter, and immediately told me he worked across the street from the station. 

    Seeing my father for the first time as an adult was surreal. Given our history, you would think that the neglect would hurt me too much to connect with him, but I didn’t feel anger, even though that’s exactly what I expected of myself. The first thing my father did when he saw me was open his fanny pack to take out a picture of me as a newborn. I was the one thing he was proud of in his life. He asked me what I was all about, and being just out of college, with no direction planned for myself, I didn’t really have an answer. Being there at that moment was what I had been looking for.

    My father lived in a house rent-free in exchange for the work he did at the storage unit. A man in the community had seen him sleeping in a gas station at night in 1999 (shortly after my parent’s divorce), and wanted to offer him an opportunity to live in dignity. The job kept him active and his mind stimulated, but because he was so old and could no longer do all the work required of him, his employer could no longer support him and was trying to find other housing options for him, with little success. His employer also had noticed that as my father aged, he seemed to have hoarding tendencies and paranoid delusions symptomatic of schizoaffective disorder, but didn’t have the ability to take care of him. I didn’t know about that side of my father until I saw the way he lived. The house he had been staying in was full of used glass jars, yogurt containers, books, newspapers, filing cabinets of mail, rope, plastic bags, coats, shoes, and an entire storage unit filled with over 100 boxes of things I am still not sure about. 

    Many people told me that taking him on as a responsibility would lead me down a rabbit hole of hurt. But, I wanted to forgive my father and believe he was good at heart. I saw this as an opportunity to help him, because although he had never raised me or made sure I was taken care of, I felt a need to know he was ok. 

    In one month, I had to get him out of the house he was able to live in for so many years and find him subsidized housing. I got him connected to SNAP, Social Security, and Veteran’s Affairs benefits, because fortunately, he had served in the military. My father was so ashamed to get set up with his benefits because he didn’t think he deserved it. He felt he had never really lived a life worthy of such, but he served his country, put his life on the line, and did what he thought was right. Ultimately, though, it bothered him most that he knew he was never a father to me, and regretted most of his life choices. He actually said that he would rather live on the street. 

    For so many years, my father depended on people, and while many got fed up with him, I realize now that my father was looking for a community of people to lean on because he never had the mental health to get to a place where he could be independent. People like my father may be the so-called 47 percent, but these are people who no matter what Romney says, shouldn’t have to be ok with living on the street.

    I’ve gotten my father set up now so that as he ages, he can live more comfortably. Every day for one month, I called Salem’s Housing Authority to check in and see if apartments would be opening up. My persistence paid off, and now, my father is part of a larger community of people who look after him. I’ve also reconnected him to his sisters. This I consider to be one of my greatest accomplishments thus far. While I work my way up to financial independence, I hope to get to a place where I can provide for him, without him having to rely on the government. But for now, I have to do what’s best for both of us. 

    As SNAP benefits get cut, and the middle class finds themselves frustrated about having to support the 47 percent, I worry about the amount of people with mental illnesses who depend on government services. There is a misconception in our society that those who are homeless or rely on these services are either using drugs or choosing to live this way, when instead it’s because they did not have mental healthcare or the family support they needed. Not everyone like my father has a person like myself to help them get back on their feet and find the services they need, and that’s why these services must exist. But it’s not just about the services existing, it’s about having someone to help people in need navigate those services and get what they deserve as human beings.

    Why is it that I, the person least likely to support my father, can go to bat for him, but the majority of Americans are unaware about how they can support someone like him? Now that I’ve done what’s necessary for my father, I want to do the “possible,” then the “impossible.” I want to help more people like him get off their feet and out of homelessness by volunteering at LIFT, an organization that helps homeless people get connected to services. I also just joined MAZON in their advocacy efforts to end hunger. These are my first steps towards becoming a more active changemaker. If you know of any similar organizations that I can be a part of, please share your insight. I’m new to this, and I’m just getting my feet wet.

    Originally published on good.is.

    — 6 months ago with 7 notes
    Climate Change

    The moon was

    Burning orange like a grapefruit,

    It’s size more sun-like

    Rotund, larger than normal

    I thought the world was ending 

    While driving home 

    Because earlier that day

    A plastic bag full of lettuce

    Burned up on the kitchen sink

    Smoking

    Because the heat outside

    Penetrated the window 

    Like a magnifying glass

    Hitting an ant

    — 9 months ago with 3 notes
    #poetry  #climate change  #nature  #moon 
    Booting Out Section A Residents to Buy Another Building

    How do you tell family
    That you don’t believe
    In their actions
    That what they’re doing to their community
    Doesn’t align
    With their love for you

    — 11 months ago
    Reminders

    The reminders of when to go to the doctor are comforting
    Coming from my mother’s lips
    They’re not automated
    Or on a digital calendar
    And they come to me with thoughtfulness
    So when I don’t hear them one day
    I’ll miss them
    And realize
    I wasn’t as grateful as I could have been

    — 11 months ago
    #family  #mother  #doctor 
    I Dream in Technicolor

    My father told me

    he dreams in technicolor

    I asked if they were

    movie-worthy, or more like

    psychedelic art videos.

    "You’d make a killing,

    if you made a movie,”

    he replied.

    We laughed.

    Then he said he couldn’t hear me

    on the road

    as I said goodbye.

    But 30 minutes later

    he called

    just to ask

    if I was safe.

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    good:

Infographic: Nanotechnology Patents in the United States and Beyond- Column Five contributed in Technology, Science and Innovation
In 2000, the United States launched the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to advance nanotechnology research, development, and infrastructure. Other countries around the world, from South Korea to Germany, have launched similar initiatives. As we move toward more digital and mobile lifestyles, nanotechnology is being recognized for its invaluable properties in sensation, speed, durability, and energy-efficiency. What is it and what countries are leading in its innovation?

I love working with @columnfive.

    good:

    Infographic: Nanotechnology Patents in the United States and Beyond
    Column Five contributed in Technology, Science and Innovation

    In 2000, the United States launched the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to advance nanotechnology research, development, and infrastructure. Other countries around the world, from South Korea to Germany, have launched similar initiatives. As we move toward more digital and mobile lifestyles, nanotechnology is being recognized for its invaluable properties in sensation, speed, durability, and energy-efficiency. What is it and what countries are leading in its innovation?

    I love working with @columnfive.

    — 1 year ago with 235 notes
    good:


Infographic: The United Names of America- Alessandra Rizzotti and Kate Slovin contributed in America, News and Transportation
This infographic is a collaboration between GOOD and Kate Slovin
Many cities in America share the same names, including street names. Most cities name streets after numbers, trees, or landscapes. Because it is common for city planners to name the first street of cities Main Street or in honor of a historical figure, like George Washington, the most common street name in the United States remains “2nd” (or “Second”) Street.
Many street names haven’t changed over the last two decades because it can create problems with deed registrations and mail delivery, and can be costly. Yet some new street names are popping up to honor more recent politicians and local heroes. For example, did you know three streets in Florida and one in California were renamed to honor President Barack Obama in 2009? Check out this infographic to see the five most popular city names and other popular street names, including some very unique ones.

I wrote the text for this infographic and did all the research. Check it out!

    good:

    Infographic: The United Names of America
    Alessandra Rizzotti and Kate Slovin contributed in America, News and Transportation

    This infographic is a collaboration between GOOD and Kate Slovin

    Many cities in America share the same names, including street names. Most cities name streets after numbers, trees, or landscapes. Because it is common for city planners to name the first street of cities Main Street or in honor of a historical figure, like George Washington, the most common street name in the United States remains “2nd” (or “Second”) Street.

    Many street names haven’t changed over the last two decades because it can create problems with deed registrations and mail delivery, and can be costly. Yet some new street names are popping up to honor more recent politicians and local heroes. For example, did you know three streets in Florida and one in California were renamed to honor President Barack Obama in 2009? Check out this infographic to see the five most popular city names and other popular street names, including some very unique ones.

    I wrote the text for this infographic and did all the research. Check it out!

    — 1 year ago with 112 notes
    #good 
    Push For Good - GOOD →

    I curate this page of crowdfunding creative progress @GOOD!

    — 1 year ago
    #good  #crowdfunding